Tagged: “dog adoption”

One-of-a-kind Hound Seeks a Forever Home

A brown and white hound lies on her foster parent.

Cheyenne, an expert cuddler.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

By Kyle Smith

This loveable girl is what they call a Treeing Walker Coonhound, but we just call her sweetness. Miss Cheyenne is a beautiful, 4-year-old, 65 pound ball of fun. She is a tall statuesque looking lady, with a long snout and gigantic ears–all tools that help her discover the world. Cheyenne came to us after her family in rural Wyoming could no longer care for her. After what must have been a frightening and confusing few months in the shelter, she has finally settled into her foster home with us, Kyle and Kyle Smith (yep, you read that right).

A white and brown hound lies on the couch.Kyle and I have been fostering for several years and have had many dogs come through our home. Each and every dog leaves a lasting impression on us and Cheyenne is no different. Her sweet, loveable, and goofy personality has made us fall in love with her. Her long legs and huge ears lend themselves to some pretty goofy looking runs and play sessions in the yard, yet she manages to tuck those legs in so tight when she wants to curl up in a ball and take a nap.

Generally, Cheyenne is a quiet girl, but like all hounds, she has a beautiful voice and will let you know when she wants something. When it’s time for breakfast/dinner, she can hardly control her excitement and will let out a couple of howls as to say, “Let’s eat!” (It’s really quite funny). But she is also very smart and knows that when foster mom says it’s time to be quiet, we sit and wait patiently for our food. Speaking of smart, Cheyenne knows how to sit, lie down, rollover and stay. She loves her food and is always eager to please, which makes her super easy to train.

Cheyenne is also a curious gal; she loves to use her nose to sniff things out in the yard and loves to explore and smell the world around her when we go for walks. If you know anything about hound dogs, you know they use their noses to help them discover the world and their noses are super strong. That being said, she probably wouldn’t be the best off-leash dog because once she got the scent of something good, it’d be hard to reel her in. ☺

While Miss Cheyenne doesn’t have any aggression towards other dogs, she’s still learning how to play. Coming from a rural area in Wyoming, her exposure to other dogs was minimal so when she sees those of her kind out and about, she can hardly stand it. She just gets so excited and some dogs might not like her because she overwhelms them. She may not immediately be a good fit with a doggie roommate, but with time she will learn that there are many dogs in the world for her to meet and play with.

A hound stares into the camera.You may have read about her allergies, but don’t let that intimidate you. Cheyenne, like many dogs (including our own), has allergies. Poor girl came to us very uncomfortable and sad because she was so itchy and swollen all the time. But, with a few basic meds and a particular kind of food, she is feeling SO much better and now all she has to worry about is being a dog.

Our hope for Cheyenne is that she will find a home that understands her breed, and won’t be mad at her for letting out a howl or two because that’s just her way of saying hello. We hope a family will give her the love she deserves, let her cuddle close and love her for her goofiness because all she really wants is to be part of your pack!

If you are looking for a pal who will love you unconditionally and bring a smile to your face every day, Cheyenne is for you. Her bond with whoever gives this girl her forever home will be everlasting.

Learn more about Cheyenne in her own words.

Overcoming the Fostering Fears

A tan dog sitting on a rug.

Wade, the first foster.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

By Amy Sell

Almost two years ago my life changed.  It all started in May, 2013. I started receiving emails from an old high school friend about dogs in need. Their situations seemed urgent and sometimes sad. It intrigued me. I thought about fostering, but also wondered how I could give up a dog or not get attached. I thought I would cry while adopting them out. But still, I wondered if I didn’t help these dogs, who would? At the time I was in a relationship and asked my boyfriend what he thought about fostering—he was against it, stating that it seemed like a “selfish” thing to do and that I probably wouldn’t be able to let the dog go when adopted. I was stunned, but didn’t want to argue about it.

Fast forward two months…my boyfriend and I broke up and after receiving emails on a weekly basis about dogs in need, I felt I couldn’t stand by much longer and wonder. I had to know. I had to know if I could love a dog enough to let him or her go when I knew the time was right—to save a life and see what fostering was like. So with much trepidation, I sent Tiana an email asking to foster Wade, a 2-year-old tan lab mix. Instantaneously I felt relief—like I was doing the right thing, but I was still nervous about what I was getting myself into.

Two days later Wade was scheduled to arrive at my apartment. Man was I nervous! I was shaking like rattle snake’s tail! My soul mate dog, Peyton, could tell, but I knew he would love the company. He’s such an outgoing, nurturing, and playful guy!

A woman named Kristin arrived with Wade and two other dogs. She was so friendly and very excited, but she could tell I was nervous. A few minutes later Tiana showed up to take one of the other dogs as her foster. Peyton met Wade and instantly accepted and loved him; I brought him into my home.

As days passed I noticed two things—Wade was a big sweetie and that caring for an extra dog is not a whole lot more work than caring for one. Wade kept Peyton active and they would chase and wrestle around the house. It was sweet harmony.  Even years later, I can spot that bond of the perfect pack.

I had Wade as a foster for about a month and a half. I’ve never admitted it, but there were times I forgot he was a foster; however, it always came back to mind that I can’t get attached. When Tiana contacted me because someone wanted to adopt him I knew I had to see it through and experience what it would be like to give up someone I cared so much for.

Tiana and I both went to Georgetown to meet a couple who owned a mountain home—a perfect place for a sweet dog like Wade to run and play. I had knots in my stomach the whole way wondering if I could go through with the adoption. The minute I met the couple the questions changed. It wasn’t, “Can I go through with this?” or “What will it be like to give up a dog?” Instead, the question was, “How can I not let Wade go on and have the best life and family?” To let go is sometimes a tough decision, but reaps the most beautiful reward.

It has been a crazy two years, but I wouldn’t change a minute of it! I have learned so much about rescuing, animals, and relationships. Fostering and working with PawsCo has become so much of who I am and something I feel so passionate about. Recently I told Tiana that she and Kristin have changed my life and made it so much more beautiful and complete. I didn’t realize early on the profound effect that Tiana and Kristin would have on my life. I am so blessed by the gifts of PawsCo, fostering, and volunteering with amazing people; each has had a beautiful impact on my life and the way I see the world.

Visit our foster page to become part of this amazing experience.

Adoptable Dog’s Wish List

A white bull terrier with a green bandanna around his neck

Hamilton at the Broken Shovels farm

By Katelyn Massey

My name is Katelyn and my boyfriend and I have been fostering Hamilton for the past three months. It’s been quite an adventure with this special boy. Based on our time together, we’ve come up with three specific wishes for this adoptable dog. If Hamilton had his own “genie in a bottle,” this is what we would request.

I wish everyone could see how amazing he is.

Yes, he is unique-looking. Yes, he is a sweetheart. But he is so much more than that. Hamilton is truly a special soul and whoever adopts him is signing up for a lifetime of cuddles and smiles. He is pretty easy to please – he just needs a soft bed, a yummy bone, some ear scratches, and lots of snuggle time!

Hamilton is a low-energy dog who enjoys a walk every now and then and would prefer a laid-back mom or dad to hang out with and love. He doesn’t have much interest in other pups and would be just fine as an only pet (though he gets along with his foster sister very well!). When you look into Hammie’s eyes, you just see such appreciation – for being rescued, for having humans who care about him, for a warm bed, and full tummy. Hammie appreciates life.

Two terrier dogs snuggle face-to-face

Hamilton snuggles with Loka, his foster sister.

I wish that I could erase his past.

It’s evident that Hammie didn’t live the best life before PawsCo. He came to us very overweight, with skin issues, loss of hair on his elbows/knees, and nails curling under his paws. His fur was a brownish-yellow color. It was clear that he had been neglected, and probably for a long while. I don’t think he had ever lived in a house before.

The physical scars from Hamilton’s past will fade over time, but the emotional and psychological scars will linger for a while. Now that he has people paying attention to him and showing him kindness, he craves it. He is already very attached to us as foster parents.

He lacks confidence, which is apparent when he meets new people or dogs. He is unsure of himself because he likely hasn’t had a lot of great experiences with other humans or canines in his past life. He looks to us for direction and that is when I can tell what an amazing dog he really is–and what great potential he has for his future. We’ve been going to training to work on his confidence, but it will take time for him to live up to his true potential.

I wish he could find the best forever home.

While we absolutely love Hamilton, it’s not the right time for us to commit to a second dog. We have more fostering to do, and adopting another dog wouldn’t allow us to help other animals in need. Hammie is a special boy and he needs a “forever” commitment. But if you’re willing to commit to him, you’re going to be greatly rewarded with tons of love, unwavering devotion, and many laughs along the way.

I know that a “perfect” home doesn’t exist, but we plan on finding one that’s pretty darn close. Unfortunately, the longer this takes, the more attached he becomes to us. Though we love him, we want him to find his forever home so he can have an easier transition and can start developing a relationship with his new mom or dad. In the mean time, we’ll appreciate the time we get to spend with him because he truly is a great companion.

Can you make our wishes come true? Check out Hamilton’s bio to learn more about this adoptable dog.

Adoptable dog looks at the camera with flowers in the background.

Hamilton poses for the camera.

A Foster Turned Adopter

A white and tan foster dog sitting on top of a couch.

Jozee, the dog who found a forever home with Stephanie.

By Stephanie Svoboda
 

I first found out about PawsCo through a co-worker. I really felt that this was something I wanted to pursue, so I signed up to volunteer and foster. I had no idea at the time that I was about to get involved in an organization that was passionate about its mission, passionate about its animals, and passionate about its people. You see, I had just moved to Denver from Minneapolis, so I did not know a lot of people and this was a true blessing for me. PawsCo immediately made me feel like I had an endless supply of friends—furry and otherwise.

I became a part of the communications team to help with graphic design, creating stickers, postcards and a trade show banner for events. While working on these materials, I was instantly falling in love with every photo of every dog and cat. I decided to look into fostering. Having two kitties of my own (Murphy, the big orange one in the picture below, and Sydney), I was concerned about the dogs I would be bringing into my home, and what my little loves would think of it all.

Small, black foster dog on a table

Finnegan

After meeting my first foster, Raisin (Now Finnegan), I knew this was for me. I saw my fosters transform from scared and shy to excited, happy, and loved. Nothing can explain how good it feels to be a part of that transformation. It is true joy! Finnegan was such a fun and perfect first foster. One of the true blessings in fostering is getting to meet the families who adopt the animals we care for. I met the most amazing couple who Finn went home with. Being a part of the meet-and-greet makes handing over the foster I loved so dearly much easier.

My second Foster was Pippy, and she was a whole other experience. I fell in love with her. She was sweet, loving, loyal and just an all-around awesome pup. When I first picked her up she was shaking like I’ve never seen. She was scared, and had no idea what an amazing life she was about to live. I had to let her warm up to me, but as soon as she trusted me our bond started. I had Pippy for almost four weeks before her perfect family came to swoop her away. After a brief meeting at an adoption event this awesome family saw the potential. They were patient with her and gave her so much love. Another perfect fit. I saw it right before my eyes.

Small, tan and white foster dog lies in a dog bed.

Pippy

Not only was I learning about different breeds, what dogs need, and training methods, but I was learning that every pup has so much potential and there really is a perfect home out there for them.

Next came Harvey. I had Harvey the longest… and he was the most challenging. But he was also the biggest transformation. The day I got Harvey he destroyed my bathroom. I won’t go into details here, but after being spoiled with such perfect little pups I forgot the reality of having a 40-pound dog take over your apartment. Just 6 months old, Harvey required the most training and attention. I first saw this as a pain, but then I realized that this was a learning experience for both of us.

Considering where he came from and what his life had been like up to that point, in reality he was doing great. I sought out training info from the adoption team and it provided me with so many helpful tips and tricks for potty training, chewing, crate training, barking, leash/walks, and socializing. After a few unsuccessful meet-and-greets I was sure I would be raising this dog for the rest of his life (I can be a little dramatic). Then, it happened. Along came Harvey’s perfect family. He truly could have the space, attention, and pup siblings he had always dreamed of. I am so happy for him.

A black and white foster dog with short legs waits by a gate

Harvey

He left me a bit exhausted in the dog department and I decided to take a little break (for a week) from fostering. I decided to see what would happen if I brought a little kitten into the mix. It was a match made in heaven. I brought 10-week-old Theo (now Howard) home, and he instantly became best buds with Murphy (my cat). Of course, being an adorable baby kitten he was instantly adopted by his perfect forever home.

Tuesday has become my favorite day because it is the day I get to see the “Animals In Need List.” I would scroll through the short bios before seeing all the cute pictures. On one of those Tuesday’s I found the most adorable picture I had ever seen and I had to foster. Although I was on a foster break because I was going on vacation in just two short weeks, I decide to see if Kiera (now Jozee) was still available. She was and she would be coming to me that weekend. From the moment I met the little jumper, I knew we had a special connection. I knew she would be a hard one to give up. After hanging out with her for the day and cuddling up with her all night, I knew I just couldn’t imagine not having her. I put an application in for adoption.

Large orange cat cuddling with a small, striped foster cat.

Murphy embraces Howard, Stephanie’s foster cat.

After a lot of thinking, and the experiences I had with my other fosters, I knew this one was different. I loved all of my fosters, but Jozee was mine. She was mine from the moment I met her. I knew exactly how much work a 6-month-old pup would be, and I couldn’t imagine not helping her become the perfect pup in my life. Fostering helped me put things in perspective. It reminded me that a cute puppy face is so much more than just a cute puppy face. Every animal needs so much attention, love, training, and socializing. I couldn’t be happier to have Jozee join my family. She is the perfect pup and I love her dearly. Thanks, PawsCo for this unexpected, yet extraordinary gift.

Read another inspiring PawsCo foster story.